‘Weird Al’ Yankovic Turns Presidential Debate Into New Anthem: ‘Bad Hombres, Nasty Women’ {VIDEO}


weird-al-debate-cover

The latest “Songify” clip below, from the Gregory Brothers, features Yankovic in the moderator role at Wednesday night’s debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump.

The Gregory Brothers wrote in the New York Times that the clip is a “terrifying space opera about bad hombres and nasty women.”

“So terrifying, in fact, that it ripped open a wormhole to another dimension, and pulled an unsuspecting Weird Al Yankovic in from his home in a parallel universe to moderate the whole thing.”

Source: The Huffington Post

For information about the war between Donald Trump and George Soros with his precious Bilderberg Group – an annual gathering of 130 of the Western world’s top financial, corporate, political, academic, media, military and policy elites, held every year since 1954 – Check out the link below:

Donald Trump vs The Bilderberg Group –  Global Showdown Exposed

To join the Trump movement go to our Facebook Group:

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Happy Birthday William Shatner: 85 Years Of His Best Moments, From ‘Star Trek’ & Beyond [VIDEO]


At 85 and still going strong, William Shatner is more than an iconic television and film actor: he’s a living pop culture legend.

Shatner
(Photo : Getty Images)

Even if you’re not a Star Trek fan (hard as that may be to imagine), you know William Shatner. The actor of stage and screen has been on the scene for almost 65 years, effortlessly immersing himself in pop culture. His portrayal of Captain James T. Kirk in the original Star Trek series is as fun and engrossing today as it was 50 years ago. Shatner has created a legacy anyone would be proud of—and at 85, it doesn’t look like he’s stopping anytime soon. Celebrate his birthday with these moments that make William Shatner the icon he has become.

Star Trek Turned 50!

William Shatner discusses the ‘Star Trek’ 50th anniversary concert tour ‘Star Trek: The Ultimate Voyage’, the on-going ‘Star Wars’ rivalry and working with legendary ‘Trek’ composer Jerry Goldsmith
Watch Diana Falzone talk about Apple News, Celebrity Interviews, Dotcom Live, In The Zone, and Movies.

Some of the best parts fell on the cutting room floor!

 

Rocket Man

Some things simply defy description. William Shatner performing Elton John’s “Rocket Man”is one such thing. Although this event has been parodied throughout the years (most memorably on Family Guy), the original has to be seen to be believed. Shatner’s strange, somewhat unsettling rendition of the song will leave you spellbound and speechless. It’s a disaster (and a good example of why his music career never quite took off), but easily one of the most mesmerizing disasters you’ll ever see. Shatner has taken all the ribbing with much good grace, and even poked fun at his own performance. It’s proof that a bad rendition can still become a classic.

Shatner Owns The Studio!

In the recording Studio with some junior director. The guy should have kept his mouth shut.

The Twilight Zone



The Twilight Zone
will go down in history as one of the most disturbing shows on television. Instead of relying on cheap shocks and gore, this iconic program preferred to plumb the depths of the human psyche and feed on our deepest fears. In this classic episode, we see a young Shatner terrified of flying and the recesses of his own mind. The effects are outdated, but the terror remains palpable—helped in no small part by Shatner’s panicked performance.

The Arena

Let’s be clear: Star Trek was a revolutionary television show that featured political commentary lightyears ahead of its contemporaries, had a level of diversity onscreen that is still all too rare, and set the stage for some legendary careers (and lifelong friendships, including the one between the late Leonard Nimoy and Shatner). It remains one of the best and most beloved science fiction franchises ever, and it all started with the original series.

That being said, it had some unbelievably corny moments and jaw-droppingly bad effects. The fight between Captain Kirk and the Gorn in the episode “The Arena” highlights everything comically awkward about this classic show. Don’t worry, they reunited years later to settle their differences.

Sarah Palin’s Tweets

Actors and politics don’t always mix, but William Shatner providing a dramatic reading of former Alaskan Governor Sarah Palin’s Tweets is a thing of beauty. His ultra-serious, intensely dramatic rendition was hilariously on-point, both mocking his own overblown style as well as the sometimes incoherent Tweets she was sharing with the world. Whatever your political affiliation, it’s almost impossible not to appreciate this deadpan performance.

Boston Legal

The Intruder

Shatner plays a white racist in this excerpt from the 1962 Roger Corman movie, Intruder is often hailed as Corman’s best movie.

With all the humor and self-deprecation, it’s easy to forget that William Shatner is indeed a consummate actor and professional. His role as Denny Crane in the hit show Boston Legal allowed him to stretch his acting chops as well as tickle our funny bones. And in this classic scene where his best friend and colleague played by James Spader is held at gunpoint, Shatner reminds everyone that he can still kick butt and take names—no matter what his age may be.

But, he’ll alway be Captain Kirk…

Source: Enstarz‎

Double-Barreled Shotgun – Joe Biden and Darrin Cross Live From The White House…


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Click on the video below, provided by The Gregory Brothers, to see Joey nail himself to the NRA cross with this epic tune.

Share it with all your friends, and “like” the The Gregory Brothers page!

The Gregory Brothers

 We respect Barack Obama for going on CNN to talk gun control with Anderson Cooper, but not sure it was the best strategy. Seems pretty obvious all he had to do was deploy Joe Biden and Darren Criss to sing a song about double-barreled shotguns, and then all americans would agree on the best methods of home defense.

Glenn Frey — Eagles Guitarist Dead At 67 


We’re told the cause of death was a combination of complications from rheumatoid arthritis, acute ulcerative colitis, and pneumonia.

Frey had been battling intestinal issues for months and had surgery in November. We’re told in the last few days his condition took a turn for the worse. He died in New York City.

Glenn co-wrote and sang on most of the Eagles hits, including “Take It Easy,” “Tequila Sunrise,” “Lyin’ Eyes,” and “Heartache Tonight,” to name a few. He also co-wrote “Hotel California” and “Desperado” with Don Henley and took home 6 Grammys with the band.

After the Eagles’ 1980 breakup, Glenn launched a successful solo career, recording numerous hits … most notably “The Heat Is On” and “You Belong to the City.”

Glenn also got into acting, snagging a recurring role on “Miami Vice.”

He reunited with the Eagles in ’94 for their monster Hell Freezes Over tour and recorded music till the end, releasing what would be his fifth and final solo LP, “After Hours,” in 2012.

The Rock and Roll Hall of Famer had been fighting intestinal issues for awhile but his condition relapsed before the holidays, forcing the Eagles to pull out of their Kennedy Center Honors appearance in December. At the time, the band said he needed major surgery that would require a lengthy recovery.

Don Henley said, “He was like a brother to me; we were family, and like most families, there was some dysfunction. But the bond we forged 45 years ago was never broken. He added … “We built something that has lasted longer than anyone could have dreamed. But Glenn was the one who started it all.”

Glenn was 67. RIP.

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Source: TMZ.com

Bowie ‘Was Still Full Of Plans’ Despite Cancer


The director of David Bowie musical Lazarus has told Sky News the singer “was still full of plans” for the future and “didn’t want to die at all”.

Ivo van Hove said the singer had told him about his cancer in November 2014 before the first workshop for the New York show.

“He said, ‘I have to tell you guys something because we are going to work intensely together. I want you to know if I’m not available or not there, why it is.’ He asked us to keep it confidential.”

Van Hove said Bowie was still very much involved in the musical – which he co-wrote with Enda Walsh.

“He was there a lot. It worked out really fine. He wrote a lot of new songs – not only Blackstar but also four new songs for the musical. He did this in one year and a half.

“He was totally not giving in to the disease and to his cancer – he was really a fighter.”

The Belgian director last saw Bowie at the Lazarus premiere in December and told Sky News he feared it would be their final meeting as the singer looked “fragile”.

“He came on stage with us. He looked well for the people in the audience, but he was fragile.

“We had a long conversation backstage after the show.

“It was beautiful and he was still full of plans because he said immediately, let’s make the second musical now – the sequel.

“He was very enthusiastic about the band which played on the Blackstar album.

“He said I want to make immediately a new album … He didn’t want to die at all. It was really not a fight against death, but a struggle for life.

“That’s the way I felt it. I admire him a lot, and it was hard sometimes but you could feel he suffered from it – he didn’t want to die, he wanted to go on.”

Lazarus, based on the book The Man Who Fell To Earth, is at the New York Theatre Workshop until 19 January.

It includes new songs by Bowie, as well as re-worked songs from his back catalogue.

Bowie himself starred in the 1976 film version of the novel.

 

Video: David Bowie: A Tribute at: Bowie ‘Was Still Full Of Plans’ Despite Cancer

The Incredibly Moving Video David Bowie Released Days Before His Death


David Bowie’s final album, ★ (pronounced “Blackstar”), was released on Friday, his 69th birthday, to great critical acclaim.

David Bowie's final album, ★ (pronounced "Blackstar"), was released on Friday, his 69th birthday, to great critical acclaim.

RCA

One day before the release, Bowie dropped the video for the album’s second single, “Lazarus.”

Following news of his death and battle against cancer, fans have been sharing the clip for the song, which features poignant, existential lyrics that have now taken on new meaning.

The video begins with Bowie lying in a hospital bed with bandages over his eyes. His upper body then starts convulsing and moving awkwardly as he starts almost rising out of the bed.

The video begins with Bowie lying in a hospital bed with bandages over his eyes. His upper body then starts convulsing and moving awkwardly as he starts almost rising out of the bed.

DavidBowieVEVO

He sings:

Look up here, I’m in heaven,
I’ve got scars that can’t be seen,
I’ve got drama, can’t be stolen,
Everybody knows me now.

Look up here, man, I’m in danger,
I’ve got nothing left to lose,
I’m so high it makes my brain whirl,
Dropped my cell phone down below.

Later, another David Bowie appears in the room, dancing, writing at a desk, then slowly reversing into a closet after grappling with a mysterious figure lurking in the room.

Even before news of the singer’s cancer battle broke, critics described the video — directed by Breaking Baddirector Johan Renck — as “disturbing.”

In a press release published by Pitchfork, Renck said:

One could only dream about collaborating with a mind like that; let alone twice. Intuitive, playful, mysterious and profound… I have no desire to do any more videos knowing the process never ever gets as formidable and fulfilling as this was. I’ve basically touched the sun.

Harry Potter author J.K. Rowling also tweeted the lyrics to the song.

Fans also wrote messages in memory of Bowie in the YouTube comments for “Lazarus”.

Fans also wrote messages in memory of Bowie in the YouTube comments for "Lazarus".

YouTube

YouTube

★’s producer and longtime Bowie collaborator Tony Visconti said the album was the singer’s “parting gift.”

In December, actor Michael C. Hall and the cast of an off-Broadway play also called “Lazarus,” which Bowie had worked on, performed the song on The Late Showwith Stephen Colbert.

The “Lazarus” lyrics in full are:

Look up here, I’m in heaven
I’ve got scars that can’t be seen
I’ve got drama, can’t be stolen
Everybody knows me now.

Look up here, man, I’m in danger,
I’ve got nothing left to lose,
I’m so high it makes my brain whirl,
Dropped my cell phone down below,

Ain’t that just like me,

By the time I got to New York
I was living like a king,
Then I used up all my money,
I was looking for your ass.

This way or no way,
You know, I’ll be free,
Just like that bluebird,
Now ain’t that just like me.

Oh I’ll be free,
Just like that bluebird,
Oh I’ll be free,
Ain’t that just like me.