Hillary Looking At TV Talk Show For ANOTHER White House Run, Move Over, Oprah!


 

  • Hillary Clinton is reportedly considering the launch of a TV show to keep herself in the news.
  • The move would position her for a 2020 presidential run, according to an insider.
  • She recently offered a toast to friends gathered at her Washington home, affecting an Arnold Schwarzenegger accent and promising: ‘I’ll be back’… 
  • Clinton doesn’t think Barack Obama will fight enough for liberal priorities, ‘which leaves an opening for her to be the acknowledged leader-in-exile of her party’

Hillary Clinton is considering another run for president – and is mulling the idea of launching a television talk show to soften the ground for 2020.

Clinton would be 73 years old if she were to challenge President Donald Trump – again – and win the White House the next time around.

Launching a TV program now would make her America’s second-oldest female news or talk show host on the small screen, after only Joy Behar of ‘The View.’

Author Ed Klein wrote Wednesday on his blog that according to a Clinton insider, the former secretary of state is open to the idea.

Clinton got plenty of on-air experience during the 2016 campaign, but has never hosted a broadcast program. She is seen during an appearance on the Ellen DeGeneres Show in May, 2016, during her run for president 

‘She thinks being the host of a popular TV show would energize the Democratic Party base and her tens of millions of fans,’ the unnamed source said, according to Klein.

‘It’s a way to make a comeback and position herself for another run at the White House starting in a year or so.’

Clinton, Klein writes, recently told a group of friends gathered at her Washington, D.C. home: ‘I’ll be back’ – and delivered the line in an Arnold Schwarzenegger ‘Terminator’ accent as she raised a glass of wine.

The rumors about what Hillary Clinton will do next have already begun to swirl. First, there was the report that Clinton was contemplating a run for Mayor in New York City.

And now comes a rumor that the former Secretary of State is looking to land a television show, and use that as a potential springboard to a third run at the White House in 2020.

Author Edward Klein, who’s written a number of books highly critical of Clinton, cited an anonymous “close Clinton source” as telling him that the 2016 democratic nominee has her mind set very much on a comeback.

“She’s utterly determined not to fade into the background,” Klein’s source said. “She intends to stay in the limelight and keep fighting the good fight.”

The show would, per Klein’s source, come from a progressive point of view and would ideally feature chats with “world leaders and progressive thinkers.”

“She thinks being the host of a popular TV show would energize the Democratic Party base and her tens of millions of fans,” Klein’s source said. “It’s a way to make a comeback and position herself for another run at the White House starting in a year or so.”

Clinton would have some work to do to appeal to democrats and independents who are, for the moment, not thrilled with the idea of her running again. A USA Today/Suffolk University poll from December said 62 percent of democrats and independents are opposed to Clinton seeking the presidency in 2020.

It would also take more lucrative opportunities off the table, including corporate boards and university chancellorships.

But the Clintons are among the nation’s richest Democratic politicians, reaping hundreds of millions of dollars in speaking fees since Bill Clinton left the White House in 2001.

Source: Daily Mail Online, et al.

Inside President Donald Trump’s Deplorable Boeing 757 Private Airliner – What He’s Giving Up For Air Force One {Video}


donald-trump-boeing-757

“Trump Force One.”AP

Donald Trump is officially America’s 45th president. He is also the first president for whom the VC-25As that serve as Air Force One will not be his first personal Boeing airliner.

“Trump Force One” — as some have dubbed Trump’s personal jet — was one of the most visible symbols of his run for the Oval Office. Trump likes to call it the “T-Bird,” according to a Discovery Channel documentary featuring the plane. According to the documentary, the Trump Boeing 757 reportedly cost a whopping $100 million!

The president has owned the Boeing airliner (registration N757AF) since 2011 and has customized the aircraft to his liking. It’s unclear what will become of the Trump 757. In all likelihood, the aircraft will be pressed into service for members of the Trump family as well as senior officials at the Trump Organization.

Have a closer look at President Donald Trump’s personal Boeing 757-200 jet.

Though President Trump may be the jet’s current owner, he wasn’t its first.

Though President Trump may be the jet's current owner, he wasn't its first.

AP

Trump’s Boeing 757-2J4ER first flew in May 1991. The new airliner was delivered to Sterling Airlines, a now defunct Danish low-cost carrier. A couple of years later, it found its way into the fleet of Taesa, also now a defunct airline.

Trump's Boeing 757-2J4ER first flew in May 1991. The new airliner was delivered to Sterling Airlines, a now defunct Danish low-cost carrier. A couple of years later, it found its way into the fleet of Mexico's Taesa, also now a defunct airline.

Flickr/Aero Icarus

Sources: Federal Aviation Administration, Airfleets.net

In 1995, the jet was bought by Microsoft cofounder Paul Allen. For the next 15 years, the Boeing served as a corporate runabout for the billionaire’s various interests.

In 1995, the jet was bought by Microsoft cofounder Paul Allen. For the next 15 years, the Boeing served as a corporate runabout for the billionaire's various interests.

Getty Images

Sources: Airfleets.net, FlightAware

In 2011, Mr. Trump took delivery of the then 20-year-old jet and added his personal touches — at great expense.

In 2011, Mr. Trump took delivery of the then 20-year-old jet and added his personal touches — at great expense.

 

The current 757 took the place of the previous Trump jet, a Boeing 727 built in 1969.

The current 757 took the place of the previous Trump jet, a Boeing 727 built in 1969.

Flickr/IowaPolitics.com

The Boeing 757 is powered by two Rolls-Royce RB211 turbofan engines.

The Boeing 757 is powered by two Rolls-Royce RB211 turbofan engines.

YouTube/Trump

Source: FAA

The Rolls-Royce engines are a feature the president was very keen to have on his plane.

The Rolls-Royce engines are a feature the president was very keen to have on his plane.

AP

Source: YouTube

Though it’s not the most fuel-efficient engine in the world, it is incredibly powerful. In fact, it’s earned the 757 a reputation among pilots for being a bit of a hot rod.

Though it's not the most fuel-efficient engine in the world, it is incredibly powerful. In fact, it's earned the 757 a reputation among pilots for being a bit of a hot rod.

YouTube/Trump

In front, the Boeing is outfitted with a modern “glass cockpit.”

In front, the Boeing is outfitted with a modern "glass cockpit."

YouTube/Trump

In airline operations, the Boeing 757-200 can carry as many as 239 passengers, but Trump’s plane is configured for only 43.

In airline operations, the Boeing 757-200 can carry as many as 239 passengers, but Trump's plane is configured for only 43.

YouTube/Trump

It has all of the features you’d expect Trump to enjoy, such as …

It has all of the features you'd expect Trump to enjoy, such as ...

YouTube/Trump

… a silk-lined master bedroom equipped with …

… a big-screen entertainment system …

... a big-screen entertainment system ...

YouTube/Trump

… a master bath with 24-karat gold fixtures, and …

... a master bath with 24-karat gold fixtures, and ...

YouTube/Trump

… a shower! In total, the plane is equipped with two bedrooms.

... a shower! In total, the plane is equipped with two bedrooms.

YouTube/Trump

In fact, virtually every fixture in the plane is 24-karat gold-plated — even the seat belts!

In fact, virtually every fixture in the plane is 24-karat gold-plated — even the seat belts!

YouTube/Trump

The plane’s headrests and pillows are embroidered with the Trump family crest.

The plane's headrests and pillows are embroidered with the Trump family crest.

YouTube/Trump

Trump’s guests also travel in style.

Trump's guests also travel in style.

YouTube/Trump

There’s a dining room.

There's a dining room.

YouTube/Trump

The seats have personal entertainment systems and convert into beds.

The seats have personal entertainment systems and convert into beds.

YouTube/Trump

There’s also a private guest room …

There's also a private guest room ...

YouTube/Trump

… with another entertainment system.

... with another entertainment system.

YouTube/Trump

But if you want to watch something communally, then there’s the main lounge, with its 57-inch screen TV and access to 1,000 movies.

But if you want to watch something communally, then there's the main lounge, with its 57-inch screen TV and access to 1,000 movies.

YouTube/Trump

Everything is controlled by touch screen — even access to Trump’s DVR.

Everything is controlled by touch screen — even access to Trump's DVR.

YouTube/Trump

If you get hungry, there’s also a galley.

If you get hungry, there's also a galley.

YouTube/Trump

Though President Trump’s 26-year-old Boeing is no spring chicken, it’s nonetheless a very impressive private jet.

Though President Trump's 26-year-old Boeing is no spring chicken, it's nonetheless a very impressive private jet.

YouTube/Trump

At the same time, nothing in the sky is quite like Air Force One.

At the same time, nothing in the sky is quite like Air Force One.

REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch

Here’s a complete video tour of the plane from Trump’s YouTube channel:

Canada’s Healthcare Wait Times and Costs in 2016 Highest-Ever Recorded. Is The What America Wants?


canadian-helth

The Canadian healthcare system works fine until you have a serious illness or need surgery. Wait times for knee or back surgery is 42 weeks on average, for example. Many Canadians know this stark reality and schedule trips south to the United States to have the surgery done there.

Journalist Paul Krugman, ex-Canadian on Canada’s health care:

“On a subzero Winnipeg morning in 1997, I cut across the hospital emergency room to shave a few minutes off my frigid commute. Swinging open the door, I stepped into a nightmare: the ER overflowed with elderly people on stretchers, waiting for admission. Some, it turned out, had waited five days. The air stank with sweat and urine. Right then, I began to reconsider everything that I thought I knew about Canadian health care. I soon discovered that the problems went well beyond overcrowded ERs. Patients had to wait for practically any diagnostic test or procedure, such as the man with persistent pain from a hernia operation whom we referred to a pain clinic—with a three-year wait list; or the woman needing a sleep study to diagnose what seemed like sleep apnea, who faced a two-year delay; or the woman with breast cancer who needed to wait four months for radiation therapy, when the standard of care was four weeks.”

A survey by the Fraser Institute found a median wait of 20 weeks for “medically necessary” treatments and procedures in 2016 – the longest-recorded wait time since the think tank began tracking wait times.

That’s more than double the wait times reported in 1993, when the right-leaning think tank began tracking the issue in Canada.

The survey looked at total wait times faced by patients starting from the time they received a referral from a general practitioner, to the consultation with a specialist, to “when the patient ultimately receives treatment.”

At 38.8 weeks, New Brunswick recorded the longest wait time among Canadian provinces.

Ontario recorded the shortest wait time at 15.6 weeks, however that province’s median wait rose from 14.2 weeks in 2015.

Median wait time by province in 2016:

  • New Brunswick: 38.8 weeks
  • Nova Scotia: 34. 8
  • P.E.I: 31.4
  • Newfoundland and Labrador: 26
  • British Columbia: 25.2
  • Alberta: 22.9
  • Manitoba: 20.6
  • Quebec: 18.9
  • Saskatchewan: 16.6
  • Ontario: 15.6

In terms of specialized treatment, national wait times were longest for neurosurgery (46.9 weeks) and shortest for medical oncology (3.7 weeks).

  • Neurosurgery: 46.9 weeks
  • Orthopaedic surgery: 38
  • Ophthalmology: 28.5
  • Plastic Surgery: 25.9
  • Otolaryngology: 22.7
  • Gynaecology: 18.8
  • Urology: 16.2
  • Internal medicine: 12.9
  • Radiation oncology: 4.1
  • General surgery: 12.1
  • Cardiovascular: 8.4
  • Medical oncology: 3.7

In a statement announcing the survey’s results, the institute estimated that Canadians are currently waiting for nearly one million “medically necessary” procedures.

“Crucially, physicians report that their patients are waiting more than three weeks longer for treatment (after seeing a specialist) than what they consider to be clinically reasonable,” the statement read.

Prior to 2016, the longest recorded median wait time was in 2011, at 19 weeks.

In an interview on CTV News Channel on Wednesday, Canadian Doctors for Medicare Chair Monika Dutt expressed concern over how the Fraser Institute collected data for the wait times study, saying she believes there are “a lot of flaws” in the research.

She nevertheless acknowledged that “there are concerns” about wait times in Canada.

“Some places are definitely better than others places, but there has been a lot of effort that has been put into being able to accurately measure wait times, which we need to do well in order to adjust the problems,” Dutt said.

Dr. Brian Day, a former president of the CMA, agreed that the problem isn’t a lack of funding.

“The studies around the world show that Canada is one of the biggest spenders but down at the bottom in access and quality,” he said.

The real problem, according to Day, is the government monopoly on insuring medically-necessary care, which leads to rationing of doctors and services, and “no accountability.”

Day has frequently pointed out that the only other country with such a monopoly is North Korea.

He is suing the B.C. government over it ban on the purchase of private insurance for medically necessary services, arguing that the Supreme Court has already ruled in Quebec that such bans unconstitutional.

Day argues that allowing private insurance would ease pressure on the public health care system and therefore reduce wait times.

The Canadian Medical Association said that long wait times are typically a “symptom of poor health system performance or poor co-ordination between systems that need to be addressed.”

A typical Canadian family of four will pay $11,735 for public health care insurance in 2015. The study also tracks the cost of health care insurance over time: Between 2005 and 2015, the cost of health care for the average Canadian family (all family types) increased by 48.5 per cent, dwarfing increases in income (30.8 per cent), shelter (35.9 per cent) and food (18.2 per cent).

The study finds the average Canadian family with two parents and two children earning $119,082 will pay $11,735 for public health care insurance in 2015. A single individual earning $42,244 can expect to pay $4,222.

FI

It is worthy to note, the system does not include dental care or prescription drugs for working people in most provinces.

Is this what America is looking for?

Sources: CTV News NCPA.org